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New IFRSs for 2021

David Baur Director and Leader Accounting Consulting Services, PwC Switzerland Apr 09, 2021

This publication is designed to be used by preparers, users and auditors of IFRS financial statements. It includes a quick reference table of each standard, amendment and interpretation categorised by the effective date, whether early adoption is permitted and the endorsement status as of 1 March 2021. 

Standard/amendment/ interpretation Effective date Adoption status EU status (as of 1 March 2021)
1 January 2021    

 

Amendment to IFRS 16, ‘Leases’ – COVID-19 related rent concessions Annual periods on or after 1 June 2020 Early adoption is permitted

EU Endorsed

Amendments to IFRS 9, IAS 39, IFRS 7, IFRS 4 and IFRS 16 – Interest rate benchmark reform – Phase 2 Annual periods on or after 1 January 2021 Early adoption is permitted EU Endorsed
1 Januar 2022      
Amendments to IFRS 3, ‘Business combinations’, IAS 16,’ Property, plant and equipment’, and IAS 37 ‘Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets’ Annual periods on or after 1 January 2022 Early adoption is permitted Not adopted at time of publication
Annual Improvements 2018-2020 Annual periods on or after 1 January 2022 Early adoption is permitted Not adopted at time of publication
1 January 2023      
IFRS 17, ‘Insurance contracts’ as amended in June 2020 by amendments to IFRS 17,  Insurance Contracts Annual periods on or after 1 January 2023 Early adoption is permitted for entities that apply IFRS 9 Financial Instruments Not adopted at time of publication
Amendments to IAS 1, ‘Presentation of financial statements’, on classification of liabilities Annual periods on or after 1 January 2023 Early adoption is permitted Not adopted at time of publication
Amendments to IAS 1, ‘Presentation of financial statements’, IFRS Practice statement 2 and IAS 8,’ Accounting policies, changes in accounting estimates and errors’    Annual periods on or after 1 January 2023 Early adoption is permitted Not adopted at time of publication

The publication gives an overview of the impact of the changes, which may be significant for some entities, helping companies understand if they will be affected and to begin their considerations. It will help entities plan more effectively by flagging up where new processes and systems or more guidance may be needed.


Amended standards

Amendment to IFRS 16 ‘Leases’ – COVID-19 related rent concessions

Effective date EU adoption status
  • Annual periods beginning on or after 1 June 2020
  • Early adoption is permitted
  • Endorsed

Issue

In many territories, rent concessions have been, or are expected to be, provided to lessees as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Such concessions might take a variety of forms, including payment holidays and deferral of lease payments for a period of time, sometimes followed by increased rent payments in future periods. IFRS 16 contains requirements that apply to such rent concessions. The IASB has noted, however, that applying those requirements to a potentially large volume of rent concessions related to COVID-19 could be complex – particularly in the light of the many other challenges that stakeholders face during the pandemic.

As a result, the IASB has provided lessees (but not lessors) with relief in the form of an optional exemption from assessing whether a rent concession related to COVID-19 is a lease modification. Lessees can elect to account for rent concessions in the same way as they would if they were not lease modifications. In many cases, this will result in accounting for the concession as a variable lease payment.

The practical expedient only applies to rent concessions occurring as a direct consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic and only if all of the following conditions are met:

  • the change in lease payments results in revised consideration for the lease that is substantially the same as, or less than, the consideration for the lease immediately preceding the change;
  • any reduction in lease payments affects only payments due on or before 30 June 2021; and
  • there is no substantive change to other terms and conditions of the lease.

Lessees that apply the exemption will need to disclose that fact, as well as the amount recognised in profit or loss arising from COVID-19-related rent concessions. If a lessee chooses to apply the practical expedient to a lease, it would apply the practical expedient consistently to all lease contracts with similar characteristics and in similar circumstances. The amendment is to be applied retrospectively in accordance with IAS 8, but lessees are not required to restate prior period figures or to provide the disclosure under paragraph 28(f) of IAS 8.

Impact

Given the pervasiveness of the pandemic and the measures taken by many governments on social distancing, it is likely that many lessees will have been granted a rent concession of some form, and so these amendments would be applicable. The amendments, however, do not make any changes to lessor accounting.

Effective date

The amendments are mandatory for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 June 2020. Earlier application is permitted, including in interim or year end financial statements not yet authorised for issue at 28 May 2020, to permit application of the relief as soon as possible, subject to any endorsement process.


Amendments to IFRS 9, IAS 39, IFRS 7, IFRS 4 and IFRS 16 – Interest rate benchmark (IBOR) reform – Phase 2

Effective date

EU adoption status
  • Annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2021
  • Early adoption is permitted
  • Endorsed

Issue

The IASB has undertaken a two-phase project to consider what, if any, reliefs to give from the effects of IBOR reform. The Phase 1 amendments, issued in September 2019, provided temporary reliefs from applying specific hedge accounting requirements to relationships affected by uncertainties arising as a result of IBOR reform (‘the Phase 1 reliefs’). The Phase 2 amendments that were issued on 27 August 2020 address issues that arise from the implementation of the reforms, including the replacement of one benchmark with an alternative one.

What is the nature of the amendments

Accounting for changes in the basis for determining contractual cash flows as a result of IBOR reform

For instruments to which the amortised cost measurement applies, the amendments require entities, as a practical expedient, to account for a change in the basis for determining the contractual cash flows as a result of IBOR reform by updating the effective interest rate using the guidance in paragraph B5.4.5 of IFRS 9. As a result, no immediate gain or loss is recognised. This practical expedient applies only to such a change and only to the extent it is necessary as a direct consequence of IBOR reform, and the new basis is economically equivalent to the previous basis. Insurers applying the temporary exemption from IFRS 9 are also required to apply the same practical expedient. IFRS 16 was also amended to require lessees to use a similar practical expedient when accounting for lease modifications that change the basis for determining future lease payments as a result of IBOR reform (for example, where lease payments are indexed to an IBOR rate).

End date for Phase 1 relief for non contractually specified risk components in hedging relationships.

Impact

The Phase 2 amendments require an entity to prospectively cease to apply the Phase 1 reliefs to a non contractually specified risk component at the earlier of when changes are made to the non contractually specified risk component, or when the hedging relationship is discontinued. No end date was provided in the Phase 1 amendments for risk components.

Additional temporary exceptions from applying specific hedge accounting requirements

The Phase 2 amendments provide additional temporary reliefs from applying specific IAS 39 and IFRS 9 hedge accounting requirements to hedging relationships directly affected by IBOR reform:

Changes to designations and hedge documentation When the Phase 1 reliefs cease to apply, entities are required to amend the hedge documentation to reflect changes that are required by IBOR reform by the end of the reporting period during which the changes are made. Such amendments do not constitute a discontinuation.
Amounts accumulated in the cash flow hedge reserve
When amending the description of a hedged item in the hedge documentation, the amounts accumulated in the cash flow hedge reserve are deemed to be based on the alternative benchmark rate on which the hedged future cash flows are determined.

Retrospective effectiveness test
(IAS 39 only)

For the purposes of assessing the retrospective effectiveness of a hedge relationship on a cumulative basis, an entity may, on an individual hedge basis, reset to zero the cumulative fair value changes of the hedged item and hedging instrument when ceasing to apply the retrospective effectiveness assessment relief provided by the Phase 1 amendments.
Groups of items When amending the hedge relationships for groups of items, hedged items are allocated to sub-groups based on the benchmark rate being hedged, and the benchmark rate for each sub-group is designated as the hedged risk.
Risk components – separately identifiable requirement An alternative benchmark rate designated as a non-contractually specified risk component, that is not separately identifiable at the date when it is designated, is deemed to have met the requirements at that date if the entity reasonably expects that it will meet the requirements within a period of 24 months from the date of first designation. The 24-month period will apply to each alternative benchmark rate separately. The risk component will, however, be required to be reliably measurable.

Additional IFRS 7 disclosures related to IBOR reform

The amendments require disclosure of: (i) how the entity is managing the transition to alternative benchmark rates, its progress and the risks arising from the transition; (ii) quantitative information about derivatives and non-derivatives that have yet to transition, disaggregated by significant interest rate benchmark; and (iii) a description of any changes to the risk management strategy as a result of IBOR reform.

Effective date

These amendments should be applied for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2021. Earlier application is permitted.


Amendments to IFRS 3, ‘Business combinations’, IAS 16,’ Property, plant and equipment’, and IAS 37 ‘Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets’

Effective date EU adoption status
  • Annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2022
  • Early adoption is permitted
  • Not adopted at time of publication

Issue

IFRS 3, ‘Business combinations - Reference to the Conceptual Framework’

The Board has updated IFRS 3, 'Business combinations', to refer to the 2018 Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting, in order to determine what constitutes an asset or a liability in a business combination. Prior to the amendment, IFRS 3 referred to the 2001 Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting.

In addition, the Board added a new exception in IFRS 3 for liabilities and contingent liabilities. The exception specifies that, for some types of liabilities and contingent liabilities, an entity applying IFRS 3 should instead refer to IAS 37, ‘Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets’, or IFRIC 21, ‘Levies’, rather than the 2018 Conceptual Framework. Without this new exception, an entity would have recognised some liabilities in a business combination that it would not recognise under IAS 37. Therefore, immediately after the acquisition, the entity would have had to derecognise such liabilities and recognise a gain that did not depict an economic gain.

The Board has also clarified that the acquirer should not recognise contingent assets, as defined in IAS 37, at the acquisition date.

IAS 16, ‘Property, plant and equipment (PPE) – proceeds before intended use’

IAS 16 requires that the cost of an asset includes any costs attributable to bringing the asset to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management. One of those costs is testing whether the asset is functioning properly.

The amendment to IAS 16 prohibits an entity from deducting from the cost of an item of PP&E any proceeds received from selling items produced while the entity is preparing the asset for its intended use (for example, the proceeds from selling samples produced when testing a machine to see if it is functioning properly). The proceeds from selling such samples, together with the costs of producing them, are now recognised in profit or loss. An entity will use IAS 2, ‘Inventories’, to measure the cost of those items. Cost will not include depreciation of the asset being tested because it is not ready for its intended use.

The amendment also clarifies that an entity is ‘testing whether the asset is functioning properly’ when it assesses the technical and physical performance of the asset. The financial performance of the asset is not relevant to this assessment. An asset might therefore be capable of operating as intended by management and subject to depreciation before it has achieved the level of operating performance expected by management.

The amendment requires entities to separately disclose the amounts of proceeds and costs relating to items produced that are not an output of the entity’s ordinary activities. An entity should also disclose the line item in the statement of comprehensive income where the proceeds are included.

This amendment could have a significant impact on entities where items are produced and sold as part of bringing an item of PP&E to the location and condition necessary for its intended use, and where management has previously considered an asset’s operating performance in its assessment of whether the asset is ready for use (for example, in the mining industry). Management might need to introduce processes to track the cost of items sold and to account for an asset as ready for its intended use earlier than before.

IAS 37, ‘Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets - Onerous contracts – cost of fulfilling a contract’

lAS 37 defines an onerous contract as one in which the unavoidable costs of meeting the entity’s obligations exceed the economic benefits to be received under that contract. Unavoidable costs are the lower of the net cost of exiting the contract and the costs to fulfil the contract. The amendment clarifies the meaning of ‘costs to fulfil a contract’.

The amendment explains that the direct cost of fulfilling a contract comprises:

  • the incremental costs of fulfilling that contract (for example, direct labour and materials); and
  • an allocation of other costs that relate directly to fulfilling contracts (for example, an allocation of the depreciation charge for an item of PP&E used to fulfil the contract).

The amendment also clarifies that, before a separate provision for an onerous contract is established, an entity recognises any impairment loss that has occurred on assets used in fulfilling the contract, rather than on assets dedicated to that contract.

The amendment could result in the recognition of more onerous contract provisions, because previously some entities only included incremental costs in the costs to fulfil a contract.


Annual Improvements 2018-2020

Effective date EU adoption status
  • Annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2022
  • Early adoption is permitted
  • Not adopted at time of publication

Issue

Fees included in the 10% test for derecognition of financial liabilities

The amendment to IFRS 9 addresses which fees should be included in the 10% test for derecognition of financial liabilities. Costs or fees could be paid to either third parties or the lender. Under the amendment, costs or fees paid to third parties will not be included in the 10% test.

Illustrative examples accompanying IFRS 16, ‘Leases’

The Board has amended Illustrative Example 13 that accompanies IFRS 16 to remove the illustration of payments from the lessor relating to leasehold improvements. The reason for the amendment is to remove any potential confusion about the treatment of lease incentives.

Subsidiary as a first-time adopter

IFRS 1 allows an exemption if a subsidiary adopts IFRS at a later date than its parent. The subsidiary can measure its assets and liabilities at the carrying amounts that would be included in its parent’s consolidated financial statements, based on the parent’s date of transition to IFRS, if no adjustments were made for consolidation procedures and for the effects of the business combination in which the parent acquired the subsidiary.

The Board has amended IFRS 1 to allow entities that have taken this IFRS 1 exemption to also measure cumulative translation differences using the amounts reported by the parent, based on the parent’s date of transition to IFRS. The amendment to IFRS 1 extends the above exemption to cumulative translation differences, in order to reduce costs for first-time adopters. This amendment will also apply to associates and joint ventures that have taken the same IFRS 1 exemption.

Taxation in fair value measurements

The Board has removed the requirement for entities to exclude cash flows for taxation when measuring fair value under IAS 41, ‘Agriculture’. This amendment is intended to align with the requirement in the standard to discount cash flows on a post-tax basis.

Effective date

All of the amendments are effective 1 January 2022. Earlier application is permitted. The transitional provisions are as follows:

Amendment Transitional provisions
IAS 16, Property, plant and equipment’ Applied retrospectively, but only to items of PP&E that are brought to the location and condition necessary for them to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management on or after the beginning of the earliest period presented in the financial statements in which the entity first applies the amendments. The entity should recognise the cumulative effect of initially applying the amendments as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings (or other component of equity, as appropriate) at the beginning of that earliest period presented.
IAS 37, Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets An entity should apply those amendments to contracts for which it has not yet fulfilled all of its obligations at the beginning of the annual reporting period in which it first applies the amendments (the date of initial application). The entity should not restate comparative information. The entity should recognise the cumulative effect of initially applying the amendments as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings or other component of equity at the date of initial application.
IFRS 3, ‘Business combinations’ Applies to business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after 1 January 2022.
IFRS 1, ‘First time adoption of IFRS’ No specific transitional provisions.
IFRS 9, Financial instruments’ Applies to financial liabilities that are modified or exchanged on or after the beginning of the annual reporting period in which the entity first applies the amendment.
IFRS 16, ‘Leases’ No specific transitional provisions.
IAS 41, ‘Agriculture’ Applies to fair value measurements on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after 1 January 2022.

 


Insurance contracts – IFRS 17, as amended in June 2020

Effective date EU adoption status
  • Annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2023
  • Early adoption is permitted
  • Not adopted at time of publication

Issue

On 18 May 2017, the IASB issued IFRS 17, 'Insurance contracts', introducing consistent accounting requirements for insurance contracts. IFRS 17 replaces IFRS 4, which currently permits a wide variety of practices. IFRS 17 will fundamentally change the accounting by all entities that issue insurance contracts and investment contracts with discretionary participation features. In June 2020, the IASB issued targeted amendments and a number of proposed clarifications in eight areas of IFRS 17. Those amendments were intended to ease implementation of IFRS 17, simplify some requirements of the standard and ease transition, and they are not intended to change the fundamental principles of the standard or unduly disrupt implementation already underway.

Impact

Scope

IFRS 17, as amended in June 2020, applies to insurance contracts issued, to reinsurance contracts issued and held, and to investment contracts with discretionary participation features an entity that also issues insurance contracts. Entities have an accounting policy choice to account for some fixed-fee service contracts in accordance with either IFRS 17 or IFRS 15. As for IFRS 4, entities may account for financial guarantee contracts applying IFRS 17 if the entity previously asserted explicitly that it regarded such contracts as insurance contracts. The June 2020 amendments additionally introduced scope exclusions for some credit card (or similar) contracts, and some loan contracts. Insurance contracts (other than reinsurance contracts) where the entity is a policyholder are not within the scope of IFRS 17. Embedded derivatives and distinct investment and service components should be 'unbundled' and accounted for separately in accordance with the related IFRSs. Voluntary unbundling of other components is prohibited.

The measurement model

IFRS 17 requires a current measurement model, where estimates are remeasured in each reporting period. The measurement is based on the building blocks of discounted, probability-weighted cash flows, a risk adjustment and a contractual service margin ('CSM') representing the unearned profit of the contract. A simplified premium allocation approach is permitted for the liability for the remaining coverage if it provides a measurement that is not materially different from the general model or if the coverage period is one year or less. However, claims incurred will need to be measured based on the building blocks of discounted, risk-adjusted, probability weighted cash flows.

For presentation and measurement, entities are required at initial recognition to disaggregate a portfolio (that is, contracts that are subject to similar risks and managed together as a single pool) into three groups of contracts: onerous; no significant risk of becoming onerous; and remaining contracts. Contracts that are issued more than one year apart should not be in the same group.

Changes in cash flows related to future services should be recognised against the CSM. The CSM cannot be negative, so changes in future cash flows that are greater than the remaining CSM are recognised in profit or loss. Interest is accreted on the CSM at rates locked in at initial recognition of a contract. To reflect the service provided, the CSM is released to profit or loss in each period on the basis of insurance contract services provided in the period.

Under IFRS 17, entities have an accounting policy choice to recognise the impact of changes in discount rates and other assumptions that relate to financial risks either in profit or loss or in other comprehensive income (‘OCI’). The OCI option for insurance liabilities reduces some volatility in profit or loss for insurers where financial assets are measured at amortised cost or fair value through OCI under IFRS 9.

The variable-fee approach is required for insurance contracts that specify a link between payments to the policyholder and the returns on underlying items, such as some ‘participating’, ‘with profits’ and ‘unit linked’ contracts. The interest on the CSM for such contracts is accreted implicitly through adjusting the CSM for the change in the variable fee. The variable fee represents the entity’s share of the fair value of the underlying items less amounts payable to policyholders that do not vary based on the underlying items. The CSM is also adjusted for the time value of money and the effect of changes in financial risks not arising from underlying items such as options and guarantees.

Requirements in IFRS 17 align the presentation of revenue with other industries. Revenue is allocated to periods in proportion to the value of expected coverage and other services that the insurer provides in the period, and claims are presented when incurred. Investment components (that is, amounts repaid to policyholders even if the insured event does not occur) are excluded from revenue and claims.

Insurers are required to disclose information about amounts, judgements and risks arising from insurance contracts. The disclosure requirements are more detailed than currently required under IFRS 4.

On transition to IFRS 17, an entity applies IFRS 17 retrospectively to groups of insurance contracts, unless it is impracticable. In this case, the entity is permitted to choose between a modified retrospective approach and the fair value approach. In applying a modified retrospective approach, the entity achieves the closest outcome to retrospective application using reasonable and supportable information and choosing from a list of available simplifications. Alternatively, the CSM at transition can be based on fair value at transition. In practice, using different approaches to transition could result in significantly different outcomes that will drive profit recognised in future periods for contracts in force on transition.

Insights

IFRS 17 will impact businesses well beyond the finance, actuarial and systems development areas (for example, product design and distribution, development of revised incentive and wider remuneration policies and reconfigured budgeting and forecasting methodologies feeding into business planning). There could also be an impact on the cash tax position and dividends, both on transition and going forward. Gap analysis and impact assessments to develop an implementation roadmap will enable entities to begin the detailed implementation project. A fundamental shift might be required in the way in which data is collected, stored and analysed, changing the emphasis from a prospective to a retrospective basis of analysis and introducing a more granular level of measurement and additional disclosures. Before the effective date, insurers will need to carefully consider their ‘IFRS 17 story’ for investors and analysts, as well as the key metrics that they will apply in the new world.

For first time adopters of IFRS, IFRS 1 mirrors the transition guidance set out in Appendix C of IFRS 17.

Effective date

IFRS 17 as amended in June 2020 is effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2023, with earlier application permitted for entities that apply IFRS 9 Financial Instruments.


Amendments to IAS 1, ‘Presentation of financial statements’ – Classification of liabilities as current or non-current

Effective date EU adoption status
  • Annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2023
  • Early adoption is permitted
  • Not adopted at time of publication

Issue

On 23 January 2020, the IASB issued a narrow-scope amendment to IAS 1 to clarify that liabilities are classified as either current or non-current, depending on the rights that exist at the end of the reporting period. The amendment requires the following:

  • Liabilities are classified as non-current if the entity has a substantive right to defer settlement for at least 12 months at the end of the reporting period. The amendment no longer refers to unconditional rights, since loans are rarely unconditional (for example, because the loan might contain covenants).
  • The assessment determines whether a right exists, but it does not consider whether the entity will exercise the right. So, management’s expectations do not affect classification.
  • The right to defer only exists if the entity complies with any relevant conditions at the reporting date. A liability is classified as current if a condition is breached at or before the reporting date and a waiver is obtained after the reporting date. A liability would also be classified as current if the entity would hypothetically not comply with any condition if that condition was tested at the reporting period date. A loan is classified as non-current if a covenant is breached after the reporting date but the entity was in compliance with the covenant at the reporting date.
  • ‘Settlement’ is defined as the extinguishment of a liability with cash, other economic resources or an entity’s own equity instruments that are classified as equity. There is an exception for convertible instruments that might be converted into equity, but only for those instruments where the conversion option is classified as an equity instrument as a separate component of a compound financial instrument.

Impact

The amendment changes the guidance for the classification of liabilities as current or non-current. It could affect the classification of liabilities, particularly for entities that previously considered management’s intentions to determine classification and for some liabilities that can be converted into equity. The amendment might also impact entities that have covenant testing dates that do not coincide with the reporting date. All entities should reconsider their existing classification in the light of the amendment and determine whether any changes are required.

Effective date

These amendments should be applied for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2023, retrospectively in accordance to IAS 8. Earlier application is permitted. If an entity applies those amendments for an earlier period, it should disclose that fact.


Amendments to IAS 1, ‘Presentation of financial statements’, IFRS Practice statement 2 and IAS 8,’ Accounting policies, changes in accounting estimates and errors’
Effective date EU adoption status
  • Annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2023
  • Early adoption is permitted
  • Not adopted at time of publication

Issue

The IASB amended IAS 1, ‘Presentation of Financial Statements’, to require companies to disclose their material accounting policy information rather than their significant accounting policies. Paragraph 117 of the amendment provides the following definition of material accounting policy information:

“Accounting policy information is material if, when considered together with other information included in an entity’s financial statements, it can reasonably be expected to influence decisions that the primary users of general purpose financial statements make on the basis of those financial statements.”

The amendment also clarifies that accounting policy information is expected to be material if, without it, the users of the financial statements would be unable to understand other material information in the financial statements. Paragraph 117B of the amendment provides illustrative examples of accounting policy information that is likely to be considered material to the entity’s financial statements.

Further, the amendment to IAS 1 clarifies that immaterial accounting policy information need not be disclosed. However, if it is disclosed, it should not obscure material accounting policy information.

To support this amendment, the Board also amended IFRS Practice Statement 2, ‘Making Materiality Judgements’, to provide guidance on how to apply the concept of materiality to accounting policy disclosures.

The amendment to IAS 8, ‘Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors’, clarifies how companies should distinguish changes in accounting policies from changes in accounting estimates. The distinction is important, because changes in accounting estimates are applied prospectively to future transactions and other future events, but changes in accounting policies are generally applied retrospectively to past transactions and other past events as well as the current period.

Impact

The amendments should help companies:

  • to improve accounting policy disclosures, either by making the disclosures more specific to the entity or by reducing generic disclosures that are commonly understood applications of IFRS; and
  • to distinguish changes in accounting estimates from changes in accounting policies.

These amendments are not expected to have a significant impact on the preparation of financial statements.

Effective date

These amendments should be applied for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2023. Earlier application is permitted (subject to any local endorsement process). The amendments should be applied prospectively.


 

Contact us

David Baur

David Baur

Director and Leader Accounting Consulting Services, PwC Switzerland

Tel: +41 58 792 26 54